30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Twenty-nine.

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Day 29: Sorry this post is a day late! (Day 30 will be too!)

This weekend we had a friend staying with us from America and Saturday was a planned fun filled day in North Snowdonia. Our destination for the day was Llyn Idwal and Llyn Bochlwyd. We actually did two #ramdomactsofwildness during our day. 1. climb for a better view and 2. making a splash!

We took an hour long slog up a rough, steep hill towards Llyn Bochlwyd, and had wonderful vistas of Llyn Ogwen and Cwm Idwal below.

We swam in Llyn Bochlwyd and Llyn Idwal, (where I caught the wild swim bug three years ago!) and had spectacular views of the Glyderau mountains. It was a fulfilling day out!

Have you visited this region of Snowdonia?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

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The Weather Didn’t Deter Us!

A few weeks back David and I played hosts to my friend, Jennifer, who traveled from the USA. She stayed with us for two nights and voiced her wish to go hiking with David and myself. So, I planned a little tour of my favourite part of the Lake District, the northern fells.

Weeks before, the UK had been in the grip of a month or so long heatwave. However on the dawn of our little excursion to Cumbria, the day broke overcast with showers and winds of 50 mph forecast.

It was a 6am start. We breakfasted, packed the car and headed out of Liverpool by 7.30am. David drove two hours up the M6. As the day lengthened it became apparent that the predicted showers would be a predominant feature of the day, with heavy, prolonged incidents. Swathes of showers swept across the countryside, as we pulled the car into a free parking space alongside our first stop: Castlerigg Stone Circle.

Castlerigg Stone Circle was raised in the Neolithic period, about 3000 BC and overlooks the Thirlmere Valley south, towards Helvellyn and north to Skiddaw and Blencathra. You can read more about the circle here. Castlerigg is only 30 minutes walk from Keswick, but on a dreary July day we managed to find parking right outside, even at 10am!

From Castlerigg we drove the 30 minutes to Buttermere, where we would spend most of the day. On arrival, I was surprised at how quiet the village was. We even managed to get parking at the National Trust car park behind the Fish Inn, paying £8 for all day. From here we donned our waterproofs and rucksacks and headed for the planned hike to Wainwright, Rannerdale Knotts.

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Rannerdale Knotts Walk

The walk to Rannerdale Knotts took us two hours through woodland and up hill. Once past Ghyll Wood the trail gained height quickly and from our viewpoint we could see the weather once again closing in. Low clouds, full of drizzly rain swept in and obscured any view of Buttermere and Crummock Water from the trig point.

The top was a bit of a scramble which (as you know) I don’t like. We managed to scurry across Rannerdale Knotts and even descended without slipping on wet stones. The walk though hindered by the rain was not ruined. We arrived, unscathed at our next destination: Crummock Water.

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Jennifer at Crummock Water

Crummock Water means the Crooked Lake and reflects the lakes shape. It’s 44m deep and nestled between Buttermere and Loweswater. The clear, cool waters make for a wonderful swim which I can vouch for as seen here.

After a quick lunch, we ventured to Buttermere and traversed the path towards the lake’s southern point. We passed the Lone Tree and even managed to walk through the tunnel, which I had never done before. Jennifer and I were hopeful of going for a swim, but the wind chopped waters and cold wind made me abandon this plan. Instead we enjoyed views of Haystacks and High Crag from the shore.

From Buttermere we drove the 30 minutes back towards Keswick, to visit my favourite lake of all, Derwentwater. We parked at the Theatre by the Lake and then walked the path towards Friar’s Crag.

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Jennifer and Christine at Derwentwater

At Friar’s Crag we enjoyed views towards Castle Crag, Catbells and Walla Crag. It was nice to share my love of Derwentwater with someone new.

We then headed into Keswick and sought shelter from the rain and wind in the restaurant of The Old Keswickian. We enjoyed a restoring meal of fish and chips before heading home. It was a fun filled day. One that I have enjoyed reliving for this blog.

Have you shared your love of a special place with a friend?

Thanks for joining in my reminiscence,

Christine x

Just a Little Stroll Then..?

With Christmas done and dusted for another year and both having the week off work, David and I decided to travel to North Wales for a day trip.

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Llyn Gwynant at sunset

We returned to Llyn Gwynant and the surrounding area. I found a moderate walk on the National Trust website that overlooked Llyn Dinas.

20161228_111053-2It was a beautiful winters day. The rugged Snowdonian landscape looked like Martian terrain in the golden light.

It was pretty evident that many people had also decided on visiting Snowdonia National Park, rows upon rows of parked cars lined the verges. Luckily we managed to find parking ourselves (outside Caffi Gwynant Café) before we embarked on our walk.

The first part of the walk began on the Watkin Path, deemed by some to be the hardest path towards Snowdon, due to loss of defined path and loose scree near the top.

The walk meanders through ancient oak woodland, before approaching Cwm Llan, with well defined paths that follow the fast flowing Afon Cwm Llan waterfalls.

Somehow we missed a turning, (there weren’t many way-markers,) so we continued along the path in front of us which wound through the valley. We past a commemoration plaque stating the opening of the route in 1892 by the then Prime Minister, William Gladstone, then on towards the old ruins of a slate quarry before the path drew steadily upwards.

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Ruined quarry buildings

By this time we knew we had taken the wrong path, and had walked further than we ought, but as the path was not too steep we decided to keep going.

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David on the path to Snowdon

On our walk we saw many other people traipsing the same path towards Snowdon, and drawing higher, we heard the whooo of a train from the Snowdon Mountain Railway (even though they say on their website that they are closed!) Perhaps it was a phantom train? As the summit of Snowdon came into view, I could see the train station and visitor centre. It was quite exciting being on a walk we had not planned.

At some 800m above sea level, David and I sat down to have lunch. We pondered on how much further it was to the top and would we get there before sunset. We also had to consider our ability. I am not the best walker/climber. So we decided not to aim for the summit but to go to the ridge and see what was on the other side.

We found Llyn Llydaw on the other side, stretching out far below us. I was ecstatic. Llydaw is one of the llyn’s I want to swim in 2017!

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Llyn Llydaw

From the ridge we turned back and started our descent. It took us another good two hours to walk back to the car park. We were both buoyed by the walk, amazed that we had managed to get 3/4 of the way up the tallest mountain in England and Wales. Today however, we are stiff and sore.

Accidentally taking the path towards Snowdon has made me realise that maybe some tarns in the Lake District are not so unachievable as I believed. Roll on spring/summer 2017!

Have you managed to climb Snowdon? If so what path did you chose, apparently there at six paths?

Thanks for reading,

Christine x

Five Go on a Grand Tour.

Five Go on a Grand Tour to Cumbria

Five Go on a Grand Tour to Cumbria

It’s quite amazing how much you can pack into 15/16 hours in just one day!

Saturday was the start of my week long vacation. David for the past week, had been making plans with his brother, Gary and cousin Keith to go for a day out to the Lake District, Cumbria. With Bilgen, Gary’s wife and myself in tow.

Keith was the designated driver and picked us up from no 49 at 8. 15 am on a bright sunny morning in Liverpool. We drove along the M62 and M6 to Windermere (the largest lake in England), stopping at Lancaster services along the way. The journey took just under two hours and by 10 am we were at the lakeside of Winderemere.

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Windremere

Windermere is not my favourite lake, Buttermere holds that accolade but we spent a good hour walking the lakeside, watching the boats sail by and people struggle with oars as they tried to turn rowing boats to the shore. David said he would like to try a rowing boat, he got scoffs of disbelief in return from Keith and myself. Bilgen and Gary wanted to take a cruise along the river, but the duration was 45 minutes and our car park stay was only for 2 hours. So we jumped back into the car and headed towards Keswick.

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DS5

Keith’s Sat Nav in the new DS5 was appalling! It took us down small dead end roads and streets where barely a Smart car could pass! And don’t ask about the ‘comfy’ seating in the back. It’s safe to say my back and bottom will take days to recover! lol

After a hours drive we finally got to Keswick and the Surprise View. Where we picnicked before the view of Derwentwater and Bassenthwaite Lake. The view was lovely. I could have stayed there all day!

Surprise View: derwent water and bassenthwaite

Surprise View: Derwent water and Bassenthwaite

After lunch we decided to head towards my favourite lake, Buttermere. However we didn’t take the left turn though we had Keith’s Sat Nav and my Google directions leading the way! We ended up on a road towards Loweswater which had no parking places! I was not best pleased!

We then drove endlessly on towards Ennerdale Water which again did nothing for me! During the walk to the lakeside I had a Tortoiseshell Butterfly land on my butterfly printed dress. While waiting for the other ‘four’ to come back from the shingle beach I met with three hikers who were disorientated and wondered on which path to follow. One asked me ‘where have you come from?’ If I had been witty I would have said.

‘By magic!’ However I am not quick witted and simply said, ‘up that path towards the car parks!’ Duh!

After a bit of a lull with sightseeing, we headed towards Wastwater (the deepest of the lakes). The clouds came rolling in and the rain followed after, though Wastwater looked very atmospheric!

Wast Water

Wastwater

It took almost two hours driving from Egremont to Kendal, where we stopped off at an Indian restaurant, called simply India for sustenance. I found it on Google after searching for restaurants in the area.

The restaurant was relatively quiet when we arrived, but after 8 pm it filled up with locals and a Stag Do, the groom was dressed up as a cow! It got quite noisy. The actually restaurant was small. Only had room for say 30 people? The ambiance was made by the people eating as the décor was a bit lacklustre. I did like the authentic Indian music though, it made me want to jump out of my chair and dance! The service was friendly and welcoming. The waiter who served us knew Liverpool and made us feel very welcome. He described the menu expertly and I could have listened to him all day talking about curries. They did not however have a dupiaza on the menu so I had to order a vegetable masala though in hindsight I should have tried the bhuna, the taster sauce we were given was gorgeous!

We all left the restaurant after 9 pm full and satisfied! The journey home only took 1.5 hours. We were home by 11 pm!

Though the day seemed long, we did indeed see lots of sights, some where new while others we had visited before. A journey is always better undertaken with friends!