30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Twenty-five.

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_25Day 25: Today’s 30 Days Wild is all about trees.

I find it difficult to ID trees, so I decided to make an attempt at some identification. I pass lots of trees on my route to work, so collected some leaves as I walked.

If you think I may have got these wrong please correct me. Thanks.

leaves

Leaves

    1. Oak: I was ok identifying this native leaf but then I read that there are two types of oak in the UK, English oak and sessile. Possibly this is a sessile oak which prefers the north? Oak trees can grow up to 40m in height and won’t produce acorns until 40 years of age!
    2. Ash: I think this is a compound ash leaf but not 100%. They can live up to 400 years, longer if coppiced.
    3. Sycamore: Again not 100% on this. It could be a maple or guelder rose. Another long lived tree. Fruits are known as samaras, or helicopters in Liverpool. Do you know them by a different name?
    4. Hawthorn: I thought I would finish on an easy one, as I’ve just ordered one from The Woodland Trust. Hawthorns are native and in spring their leaves are edible. They can grow to 15m but are usually used as hedgerows.

These were just a few of the leaves I collected. I think a couple more were from a hazel and silver birch but not certain. I really need to buy a book on tree identification. If you have any suggestions let me know.

What’s your favourite tree?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

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The Oak Tree Experiment.

On my walk to work I pass a row of oak trees. At this time of year, I noticed they had dropped lots of acorns on the ground which crunched underfoot. This got me thinking. Perhaps I could rescue a couple and experiment to see if I could grow one of them? So, I gathered a few on my recent walk and took three decent looking acorns home.

After doing some research I noted that acorns should be brown when planting. Mine were green, so I don’t know whether they will grow or not. Either way, I found a spare pot in which to plant the acorns. I made three small holes and planted the acorns before covering over with soil. I sprinkled some water and have left the pot in a sunny area. I shall update you on the progress of these little acorns and see if any of them will grow.

Have you been successful in growing a tree from seed?

Thanks for reading,

Christine x

A Walk in the Park

David and I took Riley on an hour long walk around Liverpool’s Calderstones Park. The park is named after six neolithic stones that were once part of a megalithic tomb. You can still see some of the spiraled designs etched by ancient hands on the sandstone.

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Calderstones

Our 2.4 mile walk also passed the Allerton Oak, which is an estimated 1,000 year old oak tree!

1000 year old oak

Allerton Oak

During the course of the walk, David and I enjoyed looking for signs of spring, while Riley had a much needed run! I’ll finish with a gallery of pictures for you to enjoy.

How have you been spending the long Easter weekend?

Thanks for stopping by,

Christine x