Tarn of the Immortal Fish

DSC_0013 (2)

Bowscale Tarn was the clear winner of my public vote on where my first swim of 2017 should be. Despite that accolade finally going to Crummock Water, I decided Bowscale would be my second!

As featured in William Wordsworth’s 1888, Song, at the Feast of Brougham Castle. Folklore states that Bowscale Tarn is home to two immortal fish, one with the gift of speech. With the weather forecasting sunshine and temperatures reaching the late 20°C’s, there was nothing else for it but to go in search of these immortal fish!

We got to the hamlet of Bowscale at 9.30am after a two hour drive up the M6 to Penrith and then the A66 to Mungrisedale. As we seem to be visiting the area a lot recently, we didn’t even need the help of the SatNav!

ID_29

There are only a few cottages in Bowscale and it was by these cottages that we parked the car, parking was free! As the road bends right, there is a public bridleway sign pointing towards the tarn. The path was established by the Victorians who would flock to Bowscale Tarn much more than people do now. The path was very quiet and we only saw one other person with his two dogs.

20170526_093754

The walk to the tarn took one hour. The pathway was well defined, gravelly underfoot but there was no worry of getting lost! The sun was blazing hot, even at 10am! The sparkling blue of Bowscale Tarn appeared like a mirage, it was a welcome sight!

A good few hours was spent at Bowscale, picnicking and sunbathing, before sliding my sun kissed body into the cool waters of the tarn. I found the shallows to be very muddy and my feet easily got sucked down into the vegetation. It was a feeling I did not like!

DSC_0019

Occasionally a mean wind wiped over the tarn and the water glistened like there were a myriad of tiny stars dancing on the surface. The silence of the place was only broken by the chatter of pipits nesting in the heath-land.

And of the immortal fish? I never seen head nor tail of them, other than wrestling with a rubber trout I had brought along for the fun of being silly!

Have you visited Bowscale Tarn? Been lucky enough to see the immortal fish? I’d love to hear of your stories attached to this place.

Thanks for reading,

Christine x

Into the Blue.

I have been so excited to share my latest adventure with you all! On Sunday, David and I spent a leisurely couple of hours walking the Secret Valley of Rannerdale.

With an early start to the day, and a two and a half hour drive north, we met 2000 cyclists along the A66 embarking on the Fred Whitton Challenge. On our arrival at Crummock Water, we parked the car at South Beach. I watched as people donned wet-suits and took to the water with orange tow-floats. I itched to follow them in! The weather was glorious, blue skies and bright sunshine, but with a fierce, biting wind.

crummock water

Crummock Water

David and I took the road leading away from Buttermere to Rannerdale’s National Trust car park where there is free parking, but we arrived too late to enjoy this privilege. From this car park is a path leading around Rannerdale Knotts, to the valley of Rannerdale.

The month of May is the best time to visit due to the abundance of bluebells that have become a historic feature. Even from a distance you can see the blue haze of the fields and up close their scent is intoxicating! Local folklore suggests that the bluebells grow here due to a battle between Cumbrians and Normans after their invasion of 1066. The Normans were defeated yet the blood that was spilled spawned the many heads of bluebells.

20170507_105013

Bluebells and Whiteless Pike


From Rannerdale, we retraced our steps back towards the shores of Crummock Water. As the day lengthened the numbers of walkers and day trippers swelled. The shingle beach we were hoping to visit was full of families enjoying the spring sunshine. So we walked along the road until we noticed a small secluded cove.

From this cove I excitedly stripped to my tankini, donned my neoprene boots and gloves and strapped Wilson to my torso. I waded out into the agitated waters of Crummock. Terence the turtle suggested the shallows were a balmy 14ºC but with the wind that whipped across the water, it felt much colder!

I was in the water for around 10 minutes. I really didn’t want to get out. I was having so much fun! With piercing blue skies above and green mountains all around, Crummock Water was wonderful! There were even people paddling past in canoes. Crummock looked very different to the first time we visited, you can read about that adventure here. If it had been warmer and the waters calmer I would have stayed in for longer. Swimming against the wind tired me out quicker. Shivering I came out of the water to be dried by the unrelenting wind. I got dressed quick enough and soon warmed up once back at the car with a hot flask of coffee.

Crummock Water became my first swim of 2017 and what a welcome introduction it was too! I am so happy to be back in the water again!

Dsc_0250

Until my next swim!

Christine x