30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Fifteen

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_15Day 15: I decided to turn to The Wildlife Trusts for inspiration. Their app suggesting 101 Random Acts of Wildness is free to download and easy to use. Today’s choice was to explore somewhere wild.

I walk past a community woodland daily, so decided to make a quick visit before work.

Mab Lane Community Woodland is part of the Mersey Forest and was opened in 2010. Before that the land was disused and a spot for fly-tipping. However the land was developed, 20,000 trees were planted and now there are pathways for both walkers and cyclists and is a haven for wildlife.

On my short walk, I noticed bees enjoying the brambles, wildflowers among the grasses, swallows flying overhead and the noisy chatter of baby birds in the trees.

Do you have a community development like this one near you?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

 

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30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Fourteen

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_14Day 14: This Thursday is, Throw Back Thursday. 

In 2015 I sat in the yarden and listened to visiting goldfinch fledglings. 2016 saw me poorly sketch the visiting dunnock, and in 2017 I celebrated World Oceans Day by signing up to the Marine Conservation Plastic Challenge. For 2018 I decided to once again sign up for the Plastic Challenge. To make the step to eliminate single use plastics in my everyday life.

The challenge runs from 1st – 31st July 2018.

To aid this revolution I aim to purchase bamboo toothbrushes, turn to coconut scouring pads and reuse plastic bags.

Could you also take the challenge?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Eleven

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_11Day 11: For today’s Close Up Monday, the species in question is the tiny but mighty tadpole.

In our minuscule wildlife pond we have at least two tadpoles. It has been thrilling to see them develop. At present they have grown their limbs and will soon emerge from the pond. Let’s look more closely into their life-cycle.

A female frog or toad can lay up to 50,000 eggs known as frogspawn. Tadpoles are the larval stage of the cycle and hatch from around 1-3 weeks. They eat vegetation and have adapted jaws to do this.

tadpole

Tadpole with legs

The tadpoles in our yarden have been undergoing a fascinating metamorphosis. Unlike the butterfly, who goes into a crystals to morph, the tadpole changes before our very eyes.

Lungs develop, gills vanish, and limbs grow. I thought one of our tadpoles looked pretty mean! You can see its limbs clearly in the picture. Over time the tail is absorbed and the frog/toad becomes terrestrial.

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Lifecyle of Frog/Toad

Frogs and toads are Anuran which means tail-less. Their skin is permeable to water meaning that if a frog is thirsty they just have to jump into water, while toads just need to find a muddy spot in which to absorb moisture through their stomachs. Frogs and toads are carnivorous and eat mosquitoes, files, snails and other invertebrates. Frogs reach maturity at three years old whereas toads at four. Frogs can live up to eight years and toads 12 years. I found most of my information from the Woodland Trust website, here. and Arkansas Frogs and Toads.

Do you have any frogs/toads living in your pond?

Thanks for reading, and keep wild.

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Ten

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_10Day 10: This Sunday David and I ventured to Brockholes, 50 minutes drive from Liverpool. Brockholes is a nature reserve on the site of an old quarry. It opened in 2011 and is managed by Lancashire Wildlife Trust. This 250 acre reserve has trail paths, forest walks, lakes, wetlands and a floating visitor centre.

We spent a leisurely four hours nature spotting. The highlights were: seeing a fleeing roe deer, hundreds of darting blue damselflies, dragonflies spotted over the Nook Pool, and an oystercatcher and lapwing from The Lookout hide.

Have you visited Brockholes? What was your impression?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

 

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Seven.

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_07Day 7: For 30 Days Wild, Thursdays will be known as Throw Back Thursdays.

In 2015 I snapped a picture of a blue sky. 2016 saw us visit Liverpool’s Festival Gardens and in 2017 I joined in with the Great British Bee Count. For 2018 I decided to continue with Friends of the Earth’s Great British Bee Count.

I didn’t have much time in the yarden this evening but I did manage to spot three different species of bee in five minutes of counting. Here’s what I spotted.

  1. Tree Bumblebee (and a dark variation)
  2. Leaf Cutter Bee
  3. Buff Tailed Bumblebee

Have you participated in the Great British Bee Count? What has been your star bee species this year?

Thanks for reading, and keep wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Six.

download (2)Day 6: This Wednesday I decided to go in search of worms in the yarden. I looked under plant pots and piles of leaf litter. As it’s been dry for some time here in the NW of England I was not very successful in my search. I should have waited until it rained!

All I found was lots of tigers! Tiger Worms, and a very energetic centipede that I couldn’t photograph, (it was that fast!)

Tiger Worms are litter dwellers and are often found in compost heaps. They consume dead plant material and their manure fertilises the soil. They are also great aerators of soil.

tiger worm

Tiger Worm

So, even though my search wasn’t that successful I discovered I had tigers in the yarden. 🙂

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Five.

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_05Day 5: This Tuesday I’ve been timetabled into doing a long day at work. *sigh* So I thought I would take the opportunity to document the nature sightings I see on my walk to work. I tend to get off the bus earlier than needed and then walk for 35 minutes to work. Meaning 1. I get in two miles a day and 2. I can look out for nature!

On my walk, I notice lots of bees enjoying the dog and wild roses that line the paths. The heady scent of elderflowers wafts on the breeze, while the songs of sparrows, blackbirds, robins and chaffinches lace the warm air. A buzzard is seen in a heated argument with a crow. On this occasion the buzzard won!

Hot an sweaty I arrive at work for a long day ahead.

What nature do you see on your way to work?

Thanks for reading and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Three.

downloadDay 3: This Sunday David and I (with Riley), ventured to Liverpool’s Festival Gardens in search of elderflowers. We walked 2.6 miles looking for full blooms and thankfully came away with 25 flower heads.

Once back home I cut the heads from the storks, grated the zest from four lemons and boiled a kettle.

Since last years recipe had mixed results, I opted to try another recipe. The recipe I followed was from The Women’s Institute.

  • 25- 30 full Elderflower Heads in full bloom
  • 2 kg Sugar
  • 2 lt Water
  • 4 Lemons, juice and pared zest
  • 1-2 tbsp White Wine Vinegar
  • Dried Yeast, pinch

Method

  • Boil the water and pour onto the sugar in a large previously sterilised container.
  • Stir until the sugar dissolves, then add cold water up to 6 litres.
  • Add the lemon juice and zest, the vinegar and the flower heads and stir gently.
  • Cover and leave to ferment in a cool, airy place for a couple of days. At this point, check and if it has not started to ferment (a few bubbles) add a pinch of yeast.
  • Leave the mixture to ferment, covered for a further four days.
  • Strain the liquid through a muslin lined sieve into sterilised champagne glass bottles. Seal and leave to ferment in the bottles for a further eight days before serving, chilled.

I will keep you updated on the champagnes progress.

Have you tried making elderflower champagne/cordial?

Thanks for reading, and keep wild!

Christine x

 

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Two.

TWT-30-Days-Wild_countdown_02Day 2: and Saturday was a complete wash out! With a shopping trip planned to Cheshire Oaks for dry bags for future wild swims. I decided to incorporate a visit to a local nature reserve Dibbinsdale. However on emerging from the Queensway Tunnel the rain was falling in rods! I was not dressed for rain! I stood in ballet shoes with no coat! But we decided to take a short visit to the reserve none the less. We plan to revisit on a drier day. 🙂

Dibbinsdale Nature Reserve, Wirral, boasts 74 acres of woodland, wetlands and meadows, with three miles of walking paths. On our short walk we rescued a bumblebee who was struggling in the rain and snapped shots of comfrey and meadow cranesbill. The river Dibbin runs through the reserve and looked inviting for a paddle come sunnier days.

Do you have a favourite local nature reserve?

Thanks for reading and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day One.

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_01

Finally, it’s that time of year again! Time for The Wildlife Trusts, 30 Days Wild. This wonderful initiative, aims to bring the wild into your life every day in June. Will you be joining in?

Day 1: It’s Friday and the focus today is on wildflowers!

Included with the 30 Days Wild pack were wildflower seeds embedded in biodegradable paper. I planted these today to see how much (if any) they grew in June. I’ll keep you updated on the progress!

The wildflower seeds I planted last year are doing really well and some have reseeded elsewhere in the yarden. Among them are: red campion, forget-me-not, meadow buttercup and ribwort plantain.

I aim to do 30 Days Wild a little differently this year, by trying to blog every day.

Thanks for reading and stay wild!

Christine x