30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Seventeen

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_17Day 17:  Today we visited Grizedale Forest. I forest bathed (Shinrin-yoku, a Japanese mindfulness medicine), felt drizzle on my face, smelt the sweet smell of Scots Pine, while birds noisily chattered in the trees.

We enjoyed many art installations along the path.

We took the trail towards Grizedale Tarn, walked six miles and spent a good three hours at the forest.

Have you visited Grizedale Forest? Enjoy forest walks?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

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30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Sixteen

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_16Day 16: This Saturday we decided to head to Claremont Farm, Wirral to pick our own strawberries.

Last year the weather was gorgeous! A blissful summers day. Today however the weather was changeable but we spent a leisurely time walking the field and picking the juiciest of fruits.

Have you picked your own fruit? What is your favourite?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Seven.

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_07Day 7: For 30 Days Wild, Thursdays will be known as Throw Back Thursdays.

In 2015 I snapped a picture of a blue sky. 2016 saw us visit Liverpool’s Festival Gardens and in 2017 I joined in with the Great British Bee Count. For 2018 I decided to continue with Friends of the Earth’s Great British Bee Count.

I didn’t have much time in the yarden this evening but I did manage to spot three different species of bee in five minutes of counting. Here’s what I spotted.

  1. Tree Bumblebee (and a dark variation)
  2. Leaf Cutter Bee
  3. Buff Tailed Bumblebee

Have you participated in the Great British Bee Count? What has been your star bee species this year?

Thanks for reading, and keep wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Five.

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_05Day 5: This Tuesday I’ve been timetabled into doing a long day at work. *sigh* So I thought I would take the opportunity to document the nature sightings I see on my walk to work. I tend to get off the bus earlier than needed and then walk for 35 minutes to work. Meaning 1. I get in two miles a day and 2. I can look out for nature!

On my walk, I notice lots of bees enjoying the dog and wild roses that line the paths. The heady scent of elderflowers wafts on the breeze, while the songs of sparrows, blackbirds, robins and chaffinches lace the warm air. A buzzard is seen in a heated argument with a crow. On this occasion the buzzard won!

Hot an sweaty I arrive at work for a long day ahead.

What nature do you see on your way to work?

Thanks for reading and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day One.

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_01

Finally, it’s that time of year again! Time for The Wildlife Trusts, 30 Days Wild. This wonderful initiative, aims to bring the wild into your life every day in June. Will you be joining in?

Day 1: It’s Friday and the focus today is on wildflowers!

Included with the 30 Days Wild pack were wildflower seeds embedded in biodegradable paper. I planted these today to see how much (if any) they grew in June. I’ll keep you updated on the progress!

The wildflower seeds I planted last year are doing really well and some have reseeded elsewhere in the yarden. Among them are: red campion, forget-me-not, meadow buttercup and ribwort plantain.

I aim to do 30 Days Wild a little differently this year, by trying to blog every day.

Thanks for reading and stay wild!

Christine x

 

 

 

 

30 Days Wild 2017 – Finale

o0OhgWNNSadly, it’s the end of June and the finale of The Wildlife Trust’s 30 Days Wild! Though it has been a challenge this year, I have enjoyed stretching myself to experience nature through different activities.

Initiatives like this makes you more appreciative of nature. Whether listening to birdsong, smelling a fragrance or IDing a tree or plant. It gives colour to our lives.

Day Twenty-nine: Thursday. 

As I’m writing this my skin feels so itchy. It’s psychological. I decided today to have a look at the washing-up bucket pond we set up last year. In the space of a year, the rockery plants have grown, and we had to change the oxygenating plant as the mare’s tails died. I’ve never pond dipped before so I didn’t know what to expect. The pond is not very big so I just used a glass to scoop up some of the water. I beheld hundreds of strange floating, twisting insects. In hindsight I should have took a video but a blurry picture will have to suffice.

After some research I was shocked to find that the little critters are all mosquito larvae. Images of malaria breeding insects came to mind. I read that there are approx. 30 species of mosquito in the UK. Only females drink blood as they need the protein in blood to create their eggs. In warmer climes they are the biggest killer of humans. Makes you thankful the UK is often cool!

They are often the first to colonize a new pond and other pond life and birds eat these insects. So I’m wondering, is it a good thing for these insects to be a part of my wildlife yarden? What do you think? Perhaps I need to get another oxygenating plant to help clean the water some more? Some advice would be most appreciated.

Day Thirty: Friday.

For the final day of 30 Days Wild I decided to open a bottle of the elderflower champagne and toast to the wild!

As I have never tasted elderflowers I didn’t know what to expect. The bottle kindly didn’t pop, and what was decanted into champagne flutes was a fizzy, light coloured liquid that had a hint of zest and a floral bouquet. It reminded me of grapefruit. David said the drink was refreshing but my mum said it was an acquired taste. I enjoyed it, but don’t think I could drink a lot of it.

Have you made elderflower champagne? What was your experience?

Summary: 

My third year of participating in 30 Days Wild has been a memorable one. From blissfully hot summer days to endless days of rainfall. My favourite highlights included, making elderflower champagne, beach combing on Crosby Beach, strawberry picking on the Wirral and visiting Lunt Meadows Nature Reserve.

What random acts of wildness have you enjoyed doing over the course of the month?

Looking ahead: there are still many activities to keep wild well into the summer months and into autumn and winter too. Taking part in the annual Big Butterfly Count, which begins 14th July to the RSPB’s Big Garden Bird Watch come January. There is no excuse for us to not stay wild!

What future activities are you looking forward to participating in?

A Look Back:

2015: Moths and butterflies

2016: Dancing in the rain and IDing weeds.

Thanks for dropping by,

Christine x