30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Eight.

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_08Day 8: Today’s focus is our lovely planet, Earth. Currently being exhibited in Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral is Gaia (the personification of Earth), a seven metre replica by Luke Jerram. Featuring detailed NASA imagery and soundtrack by BAFTA winning Dan Jones. The installation aims to create awe and a profound understanding of the interconnection of all life, and a renewed sense of responsibility for taking care of the environment.

10 facts on the Earth:

  1. The Earth is the third planet from the sun
  2. Is 4.5 billion years old
  3. 70% of the surface is water
  4. An Earth day is actually 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4 seconds
  5. A year is 365.2564 days, creating the need for leap years
  6. The atmosphere is roughly 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen
  7. Seasons are created by the Earth’s tilt at 23.4°
  8. The magnetic field created by the Earth’s core protects us from harmful solar rays
  9. 20% of the Earth’s O2 is produced by the Amazon Rainforest
  10. Lightening strikes the Earth up to 100 times per second

What amazing facts of our beautiful planet do you know?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

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30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Seven.

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_07Day 7: For today’s 30 Days Wild, I am going to tune in to the symphony of birdsong. If you listen closely birdsong is on the air all the time. Even in the late hour of night or early morning the song of a blackbird, confused with urban street lighting can be heard. While on my 40 minute walk to work this morning here’s what birds I managed to hear and identify.

Blackbird, blue tit, chaffinch, crow, great tit, goldfinch, house sparrow, pied wagtail, robin, starling, swallow, wood pigeon

According to the RSPB since 1966 we have lost more than 40 million birds in the UK. This April the RSPB released a single – Let Nature Sing. The aim of the campaign was to highlight the plight of birds nationally. The single got to no.18 in the UK charts. Below is a video of the single with subtitles of each birdsong featured.

What’s your favourite birdsong?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Six.

download (2)Day 6: Continuing from my 2018 30 Days Wild, Thursday’s will be know as Throw Back Thursday’s!

In 2018 I went in search of worms. The smell of rain or petrichor scented the air in 2017. I read a wild book in 2016 and in 2015 I bought homes for wildlife. For this year I’ll revisit the #randomactofwildness of reading a Wild book!

There can be nothing more wild than 365 Days Wild by Lucy McRobert. This beautiful book is packed full with nature inspired ideas for every day and every season.

What is your favourite wild book?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Five.

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_05Day 5: Today is World Environment Day. A day when people are inspired to do something for the planet, either locally, nationally or globally. 2019’s theme is air pollution. You can help #BeatAirPollution by taking the bus to work, or walk or cycle. Turn your engine off when stationary, reduce meat consumption or switching lights and electronics off when not in use.

I shall of course be taking the bus and walking to work. How about you?

In conjunction with World Environment Day, Friends of the Earth, have a campaign to double UK tree cover. Trees help slow climate change by absorbing harmful Co2 and are also home to many animal species. I’ve been debating whether to buy a sapling for the yarden but I am not sure how it would fare in a pot? The Woodland Trust have a good selection of UK species to chose from.

What do you think, should I buy a tree? If so what type?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Four.

download (1)Day 4: For this year’s 30 Days Wild, I ordered in preparation five painted lady caterpillars from Insect Lore. I’ve known about this activity for a while now and decided that 2019 was the year to focus on the miraculous metamorphosis of caterpillar to butterfly. My butterfly garden and pack of five live caterpillars arrived a week before June. It’s been amazing watching them grow(doubling in size daily) for twelve days now.

I’ve grown very fond of my hungry caterpillars, but it won’t be long before they’ll create chrysalises and the next stage of the metamorphosis will begin. For today’s post I want to focus on the larval stage. Below find photos showing the caterpillars incredible growth.

Have you tried a butterfly garden? Watched your own caterpillars grow into butterflies?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Three.

downloadDay 3: Like last years 30 Days Wild, Mondays will be Close Up Mondays. Where I take one species and delve closer.

Today’s Close Up is the anatomy of a plant. I remember in secondary school (a long time ago) being taught parts of a plant such as the petal and the stamen. So, I thought I would revisit this topic.

The plant structure I am focusing on is a flowering plant or angiosperm. According to Britannica.com angiosperms make up 80% of all plants on the planet. A flowering plant is made up of roughly six sections (though plants such as mosses don’t follow the traditional structure):

anatomy of a plantRoots, Stems, Leaves, Flowers. Fruit. Seeds

Roots: are designed to pull water and nutrients from the soil.
Stems: like roots, deliver water and nutrients to other parts of the plant. There are more complex parts to the stem which I won’t delve into here.
Leaves: capture sunlight which then turn into sugars as energy for the plant, this is called photosynthesis. Leaves also absorb CO2 and undertake a process of transpiration by absorbing water from the underside of leaves.

Flowers: are the sex organ of a plant. Flowers usually have both male and female parts. The stamen (anther) is the male structure which produces pollen and the pistal is the female. The pistal has two parts, carpel (the ovary – where seeds originate from) and the stigma (where the pollen is received). Petals often attract pollinators, such a bees and birds to the plant for pollination. Pollination is the transference of pollen from the male stamen to the female stigma.

Floweranatomy_bw

Anatomy of a flower

Fruit: develop when a flower has been pollinated. Fruits are a way a plant can spread its seed. Examples of fruit are berries, apples and rosehips.

Seeds: are the embryo of the plant and come in all shapes and sizes. They are dispersed by various ways such as by the wind or by animals. Examples being acorns and cones.

I hope you enjoyed this concise review of the anatomy of a flowering plant? If you have any comments do post them below. I’ve also included links to helpful websites which I used to compile this post.

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x


Informative websites for further reading:

Biology4kids: a helpful, wide overview on flowering plants
Ducksters.com: digestible information on the anatomy of flowering plants. Even has a quiz you can test yourself found here.
Enchanted Learning: a good start for plant anatomy
The Eden Project: a useful inforgram on pollination

30 Days Wild 2019 – Day Two.

TWT-30-Days-Wild_countdown_02Day 2: We decided to stay local today and headed to my favourite local nature reserve, Lunt Meadows.

On our three mile walk, we listened to the chirruping of warblers, watched acrobatic swifts and cooed over cute avocet chicks. Though the weather was not sunny there were many bees foraging and small moths were in abundance. It made for a peaceful few hours outside.

Did you manage to get outside today? Where is your favourite local nature reserve?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2019 – Day One.

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_01Day 1: Though summer may have begun for some parts of the UK, in the NW of England the day dawned overcast with metallic grey skies and later on drizzle.

I’d been busy planning my 30 Days Wild, an initiative by The Wildlife Trusts’ when an event to Meet the Moths at RSPB Leighton Moss was advertised, it was an opportunity I couldn’t miss.

David and I spent an hour with the moths of Leighton Moss. The volunteers gave detailed information on these wonderful and diverse pollinators, and opened three moth traps.  Some of the moths displayed was the buff-tip, a camouflage expert, and the striking peppered moth. We thoroughly enjoyed the experience and I finally got to meet a hawk moth! Afterwards we leisurely walked the trails while listening to willow warblers in the reed beds and watching swifts flit overhead. From the Tim Jackson hide we got a fantastic view of the marsh harrier!

What a wonderful start to my 30 Days Wild!

How did you spend your Saturday?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Thirty

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_30Day 30: I can’t quite believe that June is almost over! How quick the month has flown. The Wildlife Trusts’ 30 Days Wild has been wonderful in focusing the mind to the nature that is all around. Also blogging everyday has been challenging but ultimately enjoyable. Would I do it all again? Probably. There is so much out there to see and learn.

Today’s post, from Lunt Meadows Nature Reserve is a little bit different. I decided to make you all a message via a vlog. I hope you enjoy my celebration of 2018’s 30 Days Wild? Thanks to David for piecing the video together.

During our walk through Lunt Meadows there were so many butterflies, I lost count! Meadow browns, tortoiseshells and red admirals were among the numbers. The highlight for me was seeing avocets hovering and chattering overhead. It looked like they were having a heated argument with some geese!

June 2018 has well and truly been a month to remember and thank you for following me in my wild adventures!

If you have participated in 30 Days Wild this year, what have been your highlights?

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x

30 Days Wild 2018 – Day Twenty-eight

twt-30-days-wild_countdown_28Day 28: For this Throw Back Thursday, I am going to break open the elderflower champagne. Last year I made elderflower champagne which turned out to be more like cordial than champagne. So this year I made a second batch using a recipe from the Women’s Institute, with extra sprinkles of champagne yeast. In reality perhaps I shouldn’t have used four sprinkles of the yeast as the bottles have become very explosive!!

I let David cautiously open the bottle and poured two glasses of the elderflower. We shall toast to all things wild!

With the addition of the champagne yeast there is a definite hint of alcohol which was sadly missing in last years attempt. Still as flowery and refreshing as ever, especially on an extremely HOT day!

How have you been keeping cool?

In 2015 I went dragon spotting in Norwich. 2016 saw me looking for moths using a light trap and in 2017 I participated in the Great British Wildflower Hunt.

Thanks for reading, and stay wild!

Christine x